Bestel deze publicatie
annuleerbestel

The Role of Courts in Contemporary Legal Orders

The Role of Courts in Contemporary Legal Orders
  • Year of publication 2019
  • 576 pages
Editor:Martin Belov
Category: Law Constitutional Law and Human Rights
Icon_printbook 978‐94‐6236‐920‐7 | hardcover | 1st edition | € 129.95

The Role of Courts in Contemporary Legal Orders aims to address the rising importance of courts in contemporary legal orders. It explores the role of courts on national, international, supranational and global level. The book provides for a multi-discursive analysis – theoretical and comparative, exemplified with case-studies.

This book is a timely and topical analysis of pressing issues related to the enhanced role of courts in politics and the increased impact of politics on courts. It explores fundamental issues such as the legitimacy of courts, judicial activism, theory and philosophy of judicial decision-making, and the impact of politics, ethics, logic and technology on legal argumentation. It provides an analysis of the role of courts in supranational and global constitutionalism. Furthermore, the role of constitutional courts, administrative courts and criminal courts as well as the most important international and supranational courts is critically assessed. Special attention is devoted to the role of courts in the context of democratic backsliding, illiberal democracies and populist constitutionalism. Key issues related to the impact of courts on environmental and human rights’ protection are also addressed. The book finishes with the provocative chapter on the alternatives to courts.

Author's information

Prof. Dr. Martin Belov teaches constitutional law, comparative constitutional law and EU constitutional law at the University of Sofia ‘St.Kliment Ohridski’, Faculty of Law. He is also vice dean of this faculty. Prof. Belov has been visiting professor in many universities in Germany, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Sweden, Greece, Poland, and the Czech Republic. He has been visiting researcher at Max-Planck Institute for European Legal History (Frankfurt/Main, Germany) and at the Institute for Federalism (Fribourg, Switzerland).